Tag: Machi Koro

  • Top 10: 2012 games in 2022

    Looking back at 2012, ten years later, it seems like a decent year. It wasn’t hard to come up with a top ten. My top 10: 10. Keyflower. This is an exciting mix of weird auctions and worker placement, and the game works rather well with the whole range from two to six players. That […]

  • Gaming Year 2021

    Covid-19. The pandemic got better, and I got the vaccine shots. I returned to the board game cafe meetings in June. Things have become much better. The number of games I played dropped significantly from 2020: from 753 to 481. In hours, I went from 339 to 266. The main reason for this is Nooa, […]

  • Gaming Year 2015

    2015 was a solid year. Numbers-wise, no complaints, and quality has been excellent. I played lots of good games with my son, who has continued to be an active member of the cult of the new. A new game for us to try? He’s game. My daughter is also growing up and we’ve been moving […]

  • Gaming Year 2014

    Another good year, can’t complaing. 2013 was good, and 2014 improved upon that. We bought a house this year and moved in, and that meant I got a bookshelf in my office I could use for games. With most of my games visible there, my son’s interest was piqued, and we ended up trying lots of different games. […]

  • Games with my son

    My son has become my most regular board game opponent. We often play in the mornings: on weekends and on schooldays when his school starts on 9. He’s eight years old, and quite the gamer, and here’s what we play now: Agricola — We play the family game, and recently started using the Farmers of the […]

  • Gaming Year 2013

    2013 was a very good year of board games, just like 2012 was before it. My kids and I have continued to play lots of games. My son is now seven and half, and can play quite complicated games. My daughter, soon five, is also a bright little gamer, and much less prone to throwing […]

  • Machi Koro

    The game: Machi Koro by Masao Suganuma, published by Grounding in 2012. The name means something like “Dice town”. Elevator pitch: Catan resource production distilled into a 30-minute filler game. Roll dice to produce money, use money to buy your way to victory. What’s in the box? The smallish box contains cards, cardboard coins and two dice. Everything looks really […]